Case Study: It’s easy to ask a question but hard to actively listen; leaders genuinely listen to the response.

I have always been ambitious and always saw myself becoming a headteacher. I don't know where I got this drive from, but it had always been there and, at the start, I was totally up for the challenge when I took on my first headship role as acting head at the age of 30. I had been at the school for a year prior to this step up, as deputy head – my first experience of senior leadership. Within six months, the school was deemed to requirespecial measures by Ofsted. Six months later, I was the acting head after the substantive head was signed off.

Despite my lack of experience and lack of a senior leadership team, I set out all guns blazing and was up for the challenge, eagerly awaiting to learn from experienced colleagues who would surely be allocated to support the school by the local authority or diocese. But the help never came. Instead I found myself being set with unrealistic accountability targets, deficit budgets, the governing body resigning, forced academisation… and minimal support. However, I still had reserves of enthusiasm and tackled the barriers whilst managing to steer the school on the right trajectory to improve… and my enthusiasm quickly turned into poor work-life balance and my job becoming my identity.

I now know that this was the first signs of poor mental health. I convinced myself that the school needed me to work 16-hour days, that the extra work over the weekend would leads to huge gains and that the ‘sacrifice’ of missing out on family time or socialising with friends would be worth it in the end. I’m now ashamed to say that work became so all-consuming that I was checking emails on my phone as I held my eldest daughter within hours of her arriving in the world via emergency c-section, as my wife recovered in the bed next to me.

The excessive hours continued and my mental health deteriorated. I was at home so little, I struggled to form a relationship with my daughter and the first real signs of depression hit. But things were going from strength to strength at school and, when this is where the majority of your self-worth comes from, I convinced myself things were going well – and I was doing it on my own!

We academised and I was really excited to now learn from the experienced colleagues within the multi-academy trust. But in truth, the support was sporadic at best and I slowly spiralled into a deeper depression as I struggled to process being diagnosed with an eating disorder and high-functioning anxiety. Surely this was the time to seek support and let someone, anyone, know what I was feeling? No. I embraced the stereotypical male mindsetand buried my issues, putting on a brave face to the world around me. No-one knew what I was going through and to everyone else I portrayed calmness and control personified. Andthis was when things started going really wrong.

With the extra accountability and pressures that came with the MAT, I began to crumble. I became disorganised, unreliable, inconsistent, erratic in my mood and isolated myself to my office. More deficits to sort, the school being sued by a parent, permanent exclusions rescinded through not fault of my own and complaints to Ofsted ate away at my low levels of resilience and the inevitable happened – I was signed off after suffering chest pains at work.

The six week spell away from school helped me to accept I needed help and returned to work enthusiastic and ready to open up to the MAT about my troubles. I opened up and I could feel the clouds that had consumed me clearing. Occupational health was sought and it helped and weekly check-ins kept me talking. But I knew that I needed a change. The role had taken its toll on me and I was excited to see a new role had opened up within the trust. I saw it as a fresh start and a chance to regain some confidence. I still remember that conversation with a member of the MAT central team. “You must be joking! You’re needed here!” was what I heard when I honestly shared that I felt I needed a change and I couldn’ttake the school further. My honesty fell on deaf ears and within months I’d been signed off again – but this time I never returned.

The final straw? Yet more deficits to address and having to make a teacher redundant. I knew the process like the back of my hand by now and was confident I had done the calculations properly. But I didn’t have a selection panel and asked for help from the Trust. It never came and we missed the deadline, meaning the poor colleague who was maderedundant would have to start the next academic year knowing they were surplus to requirements. I’m still scarred with having to deliver that message, on my own before school on a Friday, having not slept for 2/3 days prior. I stayed professional and apologised to my colleagues, went to my office, sat under my desk and cried for a long time.

I don’t really remember what happened next but my career had fallen off a cliff face and even worse, my physical and mental health had deteriorated to the point I didn’t recognise myself. I was signed off for an initial 4 weeks which became 6 months, prescribed meds and referred to therapy. In the months that followed, I went to some really dark places as I recovered from the trauma of what happened. The job had become my identify and that was gone. At my lowest, I thought the world would be better off if I wasn’t here.

It has only been recently that I’ve processed the whole situation and have moved on. I now know that I was, most likely, suffering from depression and anxiety for nearly three years the day I finally burned out.

But I can’t help but wonder:

What if someone had really listened?

What if someone recognised the signs of my poor mental health?

What if someone, anyone, would have stepped in and supported right at the start?

I’ve learned that support is out there and no headteacher should ever feel like they’re on their own. Support networks are now all over the place and if you’re not getting the support from the authority/CEO then there are wonderful communities out there than can give you what you need.

I’ve also learned that I am strong, resilient and am so much more than a headteacher. I’ma dad, a husband, a son, a brother, a friend and I happen to work in education.

I truly believe that managers and leaders at all levels need to have an awareness of the symptoms associated with mental health conditions. Leadership in education is such a stressful job it is going to take a toll on anyone.

It’s easy to ask a question but hard to actively listen. Leaders need to check on the welfare of their staff and genuinely listen to the response. Just because someone says they are ok, does not mean they are ok. If someone’s performance has dipped, don’t threaten with capability – offer genuine, tangible support.  

After a short period of time out of leadership, I’ve recently taken on my second headship in another special measures school. It’s challenging, but the experience I’ve shared has made me so much stronger and, importantly, I have the network of support I need to thrive in the role.

Case Study: when your face doesn’t fit

Never in my career did I ever believe that I would have gone through the experiences I have within Headship, especially the last few months. The last seven years have been a huge rollercoaster and a steep learning curve, not only about resilience and emotional intelligence but also about the failings within the system and how you can suddenly become so dispensable in the eyes of some. Stepping out of my role and my career has felt like a huge wrench but also liberating at the same time. A wise person (at the beginning of my end) said “There IS life after Headship and one you can enjoy” and I now wholly believe this!

I started my first and only Headship seven years ago and felt reasonably prepared through the support, training and encouragement during my Deputy Headship in a challenging area. I was excited about the difference I believed I could make in my new school and how I wanted to ensure that all pupils within the school had the opportunity to learn skills for life that were fully transferable- the most important, I believe, resilience and reciprocity. I believe that this is something I did indeed achieve, alongside enabling pupils to dream and aspire to futures they had no idea could be possible. I also drew together an extremely divided community that was angry and resentful of each other. It also became apparent very quickly that the identification and support required to address the huge number of safeguarding issues was going to be one of my biggest challenges- opening the eyes of others to what can happen (and often did) in the lives of our precious young learners, many of whom were not in a position to start to learn because their basic needs were not being met. I know that hand on heart, when during my time at the school, it was always a place of safety and security for everyone and I had enabled this ethos of nurture and tailored support to grow and flourish.

Headship always felt like an enormous privilege and I put everything I had into it, as we all do. Not only was I meeting the challenge of a school that needed so much development it was hard to know where to start and historical results were too low, but I had no mentor from the local authority and was left ‘to get on with it’. Over time, we were successful in many new areas which were of benefit to the pupils and the school- achieving local accolades for our new award-winning choir, staff achieving local education awards for inspiring teaching and our Outdoor Learning provision, to name a few.

Sadly, the positives did not outweigh the sadness and loss within the school. Within 2 months of starting at the school a member of staff passed away from a sudden illness. Leading and supporting others with whom you had only just met was indeed a challenge, but it made us stronger and connected as a team. Who knew what was yetto come! In the following few years, I led and navigated the school through a local double murder (a former pupil of the school and their mother, who was an employee at the school) along with subsequent national and international press/ interviews and speaking at their funerals, the sudden suicide of a young member of staff anda court case of SEND discrimination (that was finally dismissed) to name a few. This was on top of school improvement and staff who weren’t open to change. On reflection (whether it was right or wrong in the eyes of some) I opened my heart to support and protect others, enabling them to heal and grieve but never really allowed myself that same grace. As a team we built ourselves back up with the self-sought support of the Samaritans, but not once did the local authority or governors recognise the impact it was having on me and offer support for my wellbeing. It is only now that I can recognise how much that was needed and how empty my ‘bucket’ had become. I even recall telling the Director of Education at the start of a Heads meeting that I was having panic attacks on the way to work and had to pull over several times before I could complete journeys -the advice given was to simply work from home one afternoon a week! This also matched the lack of school improvement support the school was offered historically being on the edge of the county.

It was after this that I started to look into the future security and growth of the school and decided to engage in research with regards to joining an Academy Trust. I felt that I eventually found one whose values aligned with ours and felt that they had listened to the journey of the school and they understood the huge challenges we/I had been facing. How naïve was I?! I did not realise that signing the conversion documents was in effect signing away my position in the school.

Following conversion, I received praise from the Trust and continued to work effectively with them, even during the first national lockdown and no issues were raised. At the start of the new academic year my eyes were well and truly opened and I began to wonder whether there was a plan to replace me. I then personally understood the meaning of the term ‘gas lighting’ and no matter what I did or achieved, the behaviours of the senior team from the Trust made me question everything I did and said and made me so confused and anxious about every move I made. Things that were said in passing were jumped upon and recorded as an issue (with no conversation) and I felt that I was constantly looking over my shoulder. I even started to believe that the was a conspiracy and new members of staff were part of the drive to push me out. It became unbearable and after approximately four weeks I was completely blindsided when a planned meeting suddenly turned into a meeting to raise concerns over my ability to lead the school. It felt as though my whole being crumbled and that my heart had been ripped out. I became frozen and numb and forgot how to function for a while.

Now out the other side, having rebuilt some of my confidence, self-belief and self-worth, I can see how toxic the situation had become and how I am now better off giving myself some time to heal and dream about what I might like to do next. I’ve never stopped to do this before - it feels very alien. I miss the children so much but know that the staff in school will continue to meet their needs and support them through the change to come.

I have realised that no matter what you do or how hard to try to hold on as tight as you can, when your face doesn’t fit, you have no control over what happens next. I have also realised that no matter what has happened, I was a successful and effective teacher/ Deputy Headteacher and Headteacher and no one can take that away from me. I did achieve more than I set out to and can hold my head up high- it is those who treat people so poorly that should hang their heads low- not me. The hardest realisation of all has been how easy it had been to become so absorbed in Headship and the pressures surrounding the role, and how I had neglected those who mean the most to me- my partner, my family and my friends. I am now ‘present’ in the room, I smile and laugh at silly things everyday and now have time to do so many things to make them smile. I am using my creative abilities to make things and gain so much pleasure from completing each project. Before now, this was only a luxury I afforded to myself in the summer holiday for about two weeks!

I have been known to have ‘wobbles’ at random times and question my identity now I no longer work in education, but I try and remember the words of my partner during one of these wobbles….“You are you, you are my partner who I have with me again, you are a supportive daughter to your ageing parents, you are an amazing step-mum to my daughter, a mum to our puppy and an amazing friend to so many- never forget that!”

I also want to thank both James Pope and Kate Smith for being there when I reached out for help- your support, advice, counsel and presence were always timely and I wouldn’t have healed as well without you. I have started to dip my toe further into HeadsUp and have been amazed at how quickly I felt at ease to share my thoughts and felt valued. HeadsUp is a safe space, a thought-provoking space and a space I will use throughout the future!


Case Study: Advocates

“You know sir, some of the other boys say you’re a w****r but I tell them you’re alright, ‘cos you are. You’re alright. So that’s alright, isn’t it?”

I was escorting a boy from a lesson he had been sent out of. His relationship with his teacher had completely broken down and it was hard to say whose behaviour was worse – his or the teacher’s. This might appear an unlikely moment to remember as a breakthrough, but coming four weeks into my first headship in a rapidly deteriorating school, it was the moment I knew things were going to be OK.  Amongst the group of utterly disaffected, educationally failed, socially disadvantaged boys in Year 10, the boys who demonstrated their distaste for school through loud, loutish, contagiously anti-social behaviour, I had an advocate.

The school I took on was reeling from a series of setbacks, most recently the massive instability caused by forty-three staff - over 50% of the teaching force - leaving at the end of the previous year. Teachers who had stayed were despondent. They were trying to be loyal to their school but were starting to question that loyalty. Other teachers were new to the school, recruited in a flurry of desperation. Many were on short term contracts making accountability difficult. The school desperately needed leadership, but as I was the fifth head in less than five years, commitment to me personally was slow in coming. People were looking at me not to see what kind of leader I was, but to see how long I lasted. 

There were a number of pressing priorities. Behaviour was terrible and needed addressing urgently if we were to keep the rump of what had once been a strong teaching force. There had been a substantial erosion of trust between leaders and the rest of the staff. Trust between the community and the school had all but evaporated. That trust needed restoring. The operational systems in place were byzantine, with complexity being misunderstood as a proxy for innovation. Things looked bad in almost every direction. 

I needed to gain people’s trust sufficiently to be able to take the school community with me through the rocky decisions we needed to take – curriculum reform, behaviour reform, a simplified school day, higher expectations. In a packed parents’ forum, I promised that things were going to be different, that I was in it for the long haul, that I was invested in the future of the school. Without looking up from her phone, one mother said “The last one said all that.” Her friend, also looking at her phone, added “And the one before.” Simply imploring people to trust me wasn’t going to be enough. I needed a way to fast forward that trust. I needed advocates.

I was lucky in that I had worked with the deputy previously, and we got on. I had an advocate there already who would reassure people that I was a decent person, that I would take care of the school. But I needed more. That meant inviting parents to come and meet me, inviting complaints so that I could get a more profound understanding of the problems, answering email after email asking what was I going to do about the shocking state of the school. It meant endless patience and endless optimism.  It meant every spare moment being spent out and about – on the gate, in the canteen, in offices and classrooms, demonstrating my values. 

Values are much discussed in school literature. Rather than trying to work out what the school needed, I went with what I believed in because integrity was going to be essential in maintaining my leadership. So I was open, honest and fair. I showed confidence and humility. I listened with curiosity. I shared details about myself with people. It wasn’t a charm offensive, it was a “this is me” offensive. And gradually, week by week, I won people over. 

Some people were, justifiably, suspicious. They had been let down again and again. But I kept at it. No matter how tired I was, how shell-shocked by what I was seeing, I kept at it – cheerful, upbeat, optimistic. I tackled every breach of the rules I saw. I took on every child who stepped out of line. I challenged every instance of low standards that other adults were just walking past. I worked my socks off.

And by the end of that first half term, I had secured advocates amongst the staff, the students and the parents. People were willing to give me a go. I had the support I needed to get on and do my job because there were enough people who agreed with that boy in Year 10 that, at the end of the day, I was alright. I had advocates.

Andy Hunter


Case Study: Wellbeing commitment should be built into our contracts

I wish I had known about Heads Up 18 months ago, maybe even 12 months ago, it probably wouldn’t have stopped what happened, but I might not have felt so alone professionally. I may have been on twitter, with a decent support network and I thought I was doing ok, but I wasn’t.

I became a head when my predecessor retired. I hadn’t intended to be a head, but felt that I needed to be head of the school I was in, as I felt I could do so much for the staff and the community. I went through the recruitment process and got the job. Academy conversion was under way, but massively delayed, in part because we were not a forced conversion. my predecessor (with my knowledge and backing) and the governors had started the process. It took ages, so I had a foot in both camps, making decisions that were in the best interest of my school, but also aware of what was coming. As we were not a typical school in our LA we often missed out on funding and initiatives and were largely ignored by the LA. The MAT was led by a secondary, and there was limited knowledge and understanding primary.

My workload, and that of my SBM, doubled and then if felt like it tripled, it felt like we were learning new systems and processes whilst still running our ‘old systems’, that worked for us. Every decision was questioned, our concerns were minimised (we’ll get to that, just keep doing what you have in place and then we will transfer over) but then we were made to feel wrong or foolish if our way of doing things wasn’t the same as their (obviously superior) way. I was making sure my staff were supported, coached, workload managed and that they didn’t feel much changed, I was so busy looking out for them and for their wellbeing, that mine took a back seat, and then disappeared. I was making decisions on the spot, not being able to think strategically, it felt that I was losing my ability to do what was best for my children, families, staff, as it wasn’t how it was supposed to be done. I was really questioned around some of the decisions I was making to support staff who were experiencing difficulties outside of school (for example; I altered their hours slightly, or supported them in seeking mental health help) I was also running a leadership team with a long term member off long term sick, and we struggled to recruit after they left, so decided not to. This meant further leadership duties falling to me and my deputy.

I was working so hard to protect everyone that I just forgot about myself. I went to the doctor convinced that I was pre-menopausal, or that I was very low in Vitamin D (again) or that there was something else…. My doctor listened, reminded me that I did a highly stressful job, I said it wasn’t stress, so she did the blood tests. Of course they all came back fine…. We had to circle back round to stress.

I was called to a meeting. I was basically told I was not up to the job. My union was excellent, my doctor was excellent. I was signed off. I crashed. I felt so awful and embarrassed. What do I tell my family, my friends (they were all ace!) My union negotiated a great package for me. I could have stayed and fought it, and I had support to do that if I wanted to. But I couldn’t, I was burnt out and having a crisis of confidence. Maybe I was a rubbish headteacher, maybe I can’t do it. Who was I if I wasn’t working in a school? If I wasn’t a leader?

You absolutely must ensure your own wellbeing, if you are so busy holding the umbrella over your staff to protect them from the storm, but you are not under it, you will get battered and unable to hold the umbrella!

I also know now that I am more than my role. I still ‘feel’ like a headteacher, but in my own  special school that supports other leaders. Not being in role doesn’t mean that you stop caring about children, staff, the system. I also know that my friends and family care about me as me, not me as a headteacher.

Stop paying lip service to wellbeing, we need money and conviction from all levels. Wellbeing commitment should be built into our contracts; sessions of coaching or supervision and someone keeping an eye on our workload

We also need to stop thinking that saying the job is tough = we are no good at it, or we are not capable. We do not need leaders as martyrs, prepared to sacrifice themselves for the good of the job. It may be a calling, it may be public service, but it is a JOB!

A colleague of mine, who is now a friend, said to me ‘you put care and compassion for children and staff at the centre of everything you do’ I want to be working in a system that truly allows leaders to do that.

I know what I am good at, I know what really matters. I am now supporting other leaders (not just heads). I may well go back into headship, but right now I am helping those that are doing the job (and other key roles in school) to maintain their wellbeing, to support their leadership development and to make sure that no one else ends up how I did.


Case Study: When resilience alone isn't enough - the importance of proactive support

Since taking up my first senior position within a secondary school, twenty years ago, I have had a desire to learn more about and develop my skills and knowledge as a school leader. As my experience grew, I became more and more fascinated in how I could  design and shape school policy in order to provide the best educational experiences for young people. I still live by this core value but found that the changing context of school leadership moved me further away from being able to do this as a Headteacher - spending too much time and effort on financial and operational matters. I know that this experience is not unique and wanted to share my own experience of living through and eventually moving on from Headship in order to help others who may find themselves in a similar context.

I took up my second headship in September 2016. I took over at a large and recently merged secondary school which had just gone through two rounds of significant restructure. In addition to this, in the few months before taking up the position, the school received a Financial Notice to Improve (FNTI) for failing to file its end of year accounts on time and being unable to set a balanced budget. On top of this I also inherited a Progress 8 score of less than -0.5 which put us in a vulnerable position with OFSTED. Two months into post, I had to suspend and ultimately dismiss the Finance Director. This process took five months and in the interim I undertook the role of both Principal and Finance Director. I worked closely with the ESFA in trying to stabilise the finances but it was clear that the significantly reduced budget would not support the structure of the new school and its failing buildings. The need to focus on keeping the school afloat was a huge strain on my time and that of the trustees. Following another poor set of examination outcomes in 2017 we were still below the floor target and our seven terms of ‘grace’ for the new school was almost up. We had made great progress in creating a real positive ethos in the school and the local community, teaching and learning was better, behaviour was much improved but this had still not impacted positively on outcomes. Although no real surprise, it was still devastating, when in May 2018, we were placed in Special Measures. The HMI at the time was clear that the fundamentals of setting the school up in the first place had not been put in place and that myself and the trustees were too distracted by finances/ESFA and not focussed enough on school improvement. As a leader, I felt about as bad as you can get; Special Measures, FNTI and below the floor target. The report wasn’t published until the school holidays and so myself and a few leaders and trustees carried this news around behind our poker faces - ironically many staff and parents were of the belief that we had probably done OK as the local reputation was increasingly positive.

As a consequence, the DFE and ESFA informed us that we needed to join a trust ‘as a matter of urgency’ in the summer of 2018. Further financial difficulties, no deal on joining a trust,  further decaying buildings, another business manager coming and going, two very positive (but draining) OFSTED monitoring visits and the start of a global pandemic meant that by Spring of 2020, I decided that I needed to move on from Headship and reconnect with my family and the life I left behind. I had originally kept going because I knew that we were on the right path and that by the Spring of 2020 we would have come out of Special Measures and would be looking forward to outcomes more in line with national averages. When schools were closed, inspections suspended (quite rightly) I knew this wouldn’t happen.

Among fellow heads in Leicestershire, I was known for my resilience and overcoming difficulties. I had even presented to them on a couple of occasions about  working with difficult financial situations. It is true that I had learnt how to keep on going but I have learnt that this can also be damaging. Whilst you are working to ignore the parts that are ‘hurting’ you could be missing the signals that you need to address some aspect of damage. 

With the benefit of hindsight and some distance from this experience, I have learnt that I should have demanded more support early on, that by trying to be the one who solves the problems and keeps everything (and everyone else) going, I was attempting the impossible. There are reasons why the Headship and the Business Manager roles are normally undertaken by two people! I have learnt that I should have insisted to the ESFA/DFE and my trustees that I couldn’t solve all of it, or carry the weight of responsibility for it all. Too many others were happy to stand by and watch me take it all on, because I presented a front of being OK to do so.

Above all, I have learnt that your fundamental values, in my case, ‘to provide the best educational experiences for young people’ should not be compromised by lack of resource and support. 

If I was parachuted into my own experience as an advisor, I would have been frustrated how the three aspects of our educational department, the ESFA, OFSTED and the DFE could exert such conflicting priorities on an individual or school. Each demanded we spend more time focussing on their particular aspect of concern, and criticised us for focussing too much on the others.

When a school such as mine gets itself into difficulties, every agency should be on hand to lend support but not compete for their own priorities.

At one of the lowest points I reached out to James Pope who was always available to lend a virtual ear. Whilst this was invaluable, it is a shame that ‘the system’ still doesn’t acknowledge or support school leaders in difficulties.

Five months since walking away from headship for the last time I am in a much better place. I now work within an excellent Trust as School Improvement Lead, I am able to focus 100% on teaching and learning, leadership, CPD and school improvement. I find that I am able to use the best bits of my school leadership experience and I enjoy the fact of being able to work within my capabilities rather than constantly on the edge of incompetence. 


A New Normal: Looking to 2030

Ten years ago there was a lot of excitement about a ‘2020 Vision’ and what the education system might look like. In the end this excitement was misplaced and not just because of the pandemic. The possibilities which seemed tangible about the future of schooling had not been fulfilled. The pupil premium gap was as stubborn as ever, off-rolling remained a very live issue and the levels of violence which affected young people were disturbingly high. The recruitment and retention of teachers were both significant challenges as had been the case for some time and arguably finished the decade in a worse position than at the beginning. I am sure there will be many with more positive narratives to tell. It is true that the new Ofsted philosophy and the Early Career Framework, amongst other initiatives, were in their infancy at the time of the first lockdown in March 2020 but it was too soon to judge any impact.

 

While it is tempting at the time of writing (January 2020) to want to return to ‘normal’ we should aim for far better than the normality which existed pre-lockdown in March 2020. Some of this normality from an educational perspective was revealed during the first six months of the pandemic in a very public way. The grading process for GCSE and A level examinations in 2020 was a farce, and betrayed all too obviously the lack of trust from the government towards the profession. This was also on show as Ofsted took far too long to abandon its preferred modus operandi on more than one occasion. It felt that unless high-stakes cliff-edge accountability was in place from the angles of both assessment and inspection then central government was very nervous about the quality of what schools would be offering. The Secretary of State’s emphasis on parents contacting Ofsted if they were unhappy with a school’s remote education offer acted as further evidence.

 

By 2031 the relationship between government and the profession must be in a better place, not least because it is a poor advertisement for those who may join and those in two minds as to whether they should stay. As a profession we must aim to attract as many as possible with the potential to become fantastic teachers, and for a much higher proportion of those in their formative years to remain in the classroom. In order to do this the profession will need to work more effectively as a collective whole with collaboration, not competition, between trusts and schools as the distinguishing feature. Relationships within the profession need to mature in the same as they do between the profession and government. In 2020 there was far too much concern within secondary schools and MATs as to how their Centre Assessed Grades would hold up against the competition, as part of a sense that what really mattered was the achievement of the school and not those of the students. The process of recruiting and retaining the best teachers will partly depend on the moral core of the profession and what they see in the behaviour of their leaders.

 

The working conditions available in other professions will also be a factor. The issues around the lack of flexibility for teachers have only been amplified during the pandemic. Working from home with flexible hours is not going to be on offer for teachers, or at least not in the same way in other jobs, and those who have enjoyed it during the pandemic may not appreciate losing it. The gap between the day to day conditions of teaching and those in other industries will only grow. The truth is that teachers have always worked from home but it has been to carry out tasks which could always be delivered off-site, such as marking and planning in evenings and at weekends. Teaching from home may be possible for some, but not as standard practice. 

Conversely there are people who do not enjoy working from home. This includes those who do not have the space to do so. A family in a three bedroom house is in a far different position to several adults in a two bed flat unable to have a private conversation or work with an unreliable connection. Many enjoy the social side of work, and do not want it to be confined to a two dimensional screen. Does anyone really enjoy a ‘zoom lunchtime’? The benefits of having a workplace to attend and a stronger sense of camaraderie may be a greater benefit than is currently realised.

 

The relative stability of the profession compared to others may offer advantages. Schools will be less affected by Brexit than other workplaces, and the same applies to the automation of work or outsourcing to abroad. A salary with a pension may also look attractive in the likely difficult economic conditions ahead. These are all positives, and are worth making explicit, but they are unlikely to be enough to resolve the issue in the long-term.

 

Professional development opportunities need to be in the right place. Every school should be in a position where their programme has the requisite quality and quantity. Online learning for teachers can deliver the new National Professional Qualification programmes, master’s degrees, subject specialist workshops and access to the best researchers and speakers. Previously attendance in person was the only viable option for the vast majority. Anyone can attend any school’s INSET day if both parties are so inclined, or sign up to any university’s postgraduate programmes. High quality candidates will still be able to have their pick of schools, and the professional development opportunities may be the point of differentiation. 

 

The process of schooling must also move forward, and the professionals with them. One legacy of the pandemic is that those whose eyes always glassed over whenever they listened to a message around the speed of change in the workplace in this day and age, or how many different careers or jobs a student might have in the 21st century, are now paying attention. Every adult and child has learned new skills and competencies over the last year as they adjusted to lockdown life, and that process still has some way to run. If schools can demonstrate such agility in such a short space of time, then there is no doubt that education in 2031 can be very different if we choose it to be the case and if the government allows it. In a rare display of unity, education trade unions showed their collective strength in early January 2020 about the safety of returning to school and the government was forced to change its position. If this acts as a catalyst to increase the levels of dialogue and influence in the long term it will be positive for the profession.

 

Today’s year 1 students will take their GCSE examinations in 2031 and they will not expect an education which is stuck in the past. They are the most advanced group of six year olds in terms of their IT skills which has ever existed. They will not expect to abandon how they have learned during the pandemic going forward, or for their opportunities to be narrowed in the future. If their school’s key stage 4 or 5 option blocks do not allow them to take their subjects of choice they will seek a solution to be found if they are to stay. When there are topics they do not understand in class, they should be able to access a high standard of online resources and possibly a qualified adult to take them through it. In the case of the latter they will not care where the person teaching them on the screen is located, which may provide opportunities to some. Above all they are unlikely to accept that their future should be determined by fifty hours of hand-written examinations at 16 and 18 which do not test the breadth of the subject. The relevance of the system will be in play.

 

This includes the day to day experience of schooling. The model of all students and teachers on site for six to seven hours a day from Monday to Friday is much more subject to question given the quality remote education has reached already. In my view, it will remain a sufficiently inferior experience to be a genuine challenge to the standard model but it will shape it nonetheless. What will happen when a year 13 student asks to learn from home one or two days per week, in the way that has become common in the workplace?

 

The young people of 2031 will need a renewed profession as do those who work within it. It is very possible that the economic circumstances over the next five or even ten years mean that the proportion of students who qualify for free school meals will increase, and the prospects for families to extricate themselves from these circumstances diminish. The students whose future is most at risk require qualified, motivated teachers who are happy to be in a physical workplace, reject the flexibility of other professions, want to stay in the profession and develop their skills over time. For that to happen schools must work together more effectively as a group and central government must be explicit in its trust and confidence of the profession.


Case Study: After 27 years, I was knocked, battered & bruised.

“The light shines in the darkness and the darkness cannot overcome it”

Events in our professional lives may trip us up, or even stop us in our tracks – but we are stronger than we think.  When this happened to me after twenty-seven years of an eventful and positive career in education, I was knocked, battered and bruised.  I was not sure whether I would remain in the profession.

 Having led the school through its first Ofsted inspection I was feeling extremely positive.  It had been a hard few years, but I had been working towards showing the world just how amazing the school community that we had created was!  We had done well, bearing in mind that less than four years ago the school and everything connected to it, did not exist! 

Twelve weeks from the publication of the Ofsted report, unbelievably, I was under investigation for gross misconduct that potentially could have led to my dismissal.  The speed at which it all happened was bewildering. How? Why? Where was the support?  

I felt alone, misunderstood and marginalised by colleagues that I had thought I was valued by/of, and utter confusion reigned. The investigation took place – way too slowly.  Union support was poor.  Line management support was non-existent. The result was punitive – effectively I could not leave to get another job and there were some internal competency targets needed to be met. Interestingly, the investigation did reveal that the organisation was culpable in some of the allegations, which made me question the validity of the investigation.  

As part of a multi-academy trust, isn’t this WHY trusts exist?  To support, help and promote good practice? A year after the investigation, I resigned from my post with no job to go to. I tried to secure a post but struggled because of the impact of the investigation. I was knocked, battered, bruised, bitter and traumatised. I still am – but everyday less so.

I have learned that:

  • Values are everything and sticking to them navigated me through the mess of emotions
  • Integrity carried me through and I am glad that I behaved the way I did throughout the process
  • Looking after people is the best employer attribute that anyone will remember when they leave
  • If an organisation cannot see your worth, don’t hang around or ‘beg’ them to see what they cannot see

 There’s a few things I think the system could learn from my experience:

  • Look after ALL staff.  No lip service – REALLY do it.  
  • Think carefully about how leaders are treated – otherwise they will walk away – either bitter or broken
  • School leaders need some external coaching support as a mandatory part of the role and it should be put in place as soon as someone gains a school leadership post

 

Working with others and being of value is still my overriding desire – but I now do it on my terms! I support others who lead school communities to enable the best for the children and young people that they serve.  I have re-trained and now offer my newly found skills to others.   I have a great work-life balance and less money – but I have peace.  Priceless.


Do I tick the box?

Do I tick the box?

I am a gay headteacher. This has been and continues to be a professional barrier for me. In the past I have been told that I should not be a headteacher as parents would not want me lead their child’s school, that parents would take their children out of the school ‘in droves’ if they knew. That staff would not respect me and they would leave. Very recently I was told not to apply for headship at a Church of England school as they would not want 'A gay person talking about Jesus.' I realise that these are the views of individuals and not representative of the education sector or indeed the Church of England but it does raise a few questions.

If somebody is willing to say these things out loud and to my face what are they actually thinking on the inside – is it much worse? Also if a few people can say it out loud, how many others think it but don’t say it? The term ‘covert homophobe’ can be interpreted in a few ways but for the purpose of this think piece I am going to use it to describe people who are outwardly positive about members of the LGBTQI+ community but on the inside this is not the case. I cannot count the number of times I hear ‘I love gay people, lots of my friends are gay’ to be followed by a homophobic joke when they think I can’t hear.

Another burning question I have is what to do when I am filling in application forms. Do I tick the lesbian box, leave it blank or lie and tick heterosexual? The easy answer is of course to tick the lesbian box - but does that put me at an immediate disadvantage? Well it does if the person shortlisting is a covert homophobe. I have been advised to always tick it and then if they don’t shortlist you for that reason then it is not the right school for me. Why? There might be only one covert homophobe in a staff of 100 or it could be that I can change their mind? More importantly why should I not be given the job? If I am qualified who are they to stop me! The other side to this coin is if I do get shortlisted, is it because I ticked the box? Are they interviewing me, with no thoughts of ever giving me the job, just because it will look good on their diversity statistics?

I do still hear the phrases

‘Surely that doesn’t happen these days?’,

‘Things are different now.’

In some ways society has progressed, it is less prevalent but by no means gone. In my private life things are the same. I am always conscious of where I am and who is around me. I often feel unable to ‘relax’ in public spaces and show any affection towards my partner.

Covert homophobia happens all the time, I am sure this is the same for covert racism. I have been seated out of turn at restaurants, I have been threatened when I held my partners hand. Then there are the more serious examples including a man shouting ‘I just need the right man to show me how it is done – then I wouldn’t be a lesbian. I am not sure if he meant it to be a harrowing threat, but that is how it felt. The world is a smaller place for me, there are several countries, I cannot visit or teach in. There are still countries where being gay is punishable by death. Ticking the box is not an easy decision, previous homophobic incidents scar in the same way as any other discrimination. It cannot be easily erased. So I ask you to think about the following:    

When you get an application from somebody who has ticked the box, understand how much this person may have agonised over this.
Try to think about new members of staff who are gay and go out of your way to support them as much as you can, covert homophobia is still around and may well be present in your staffroom when you are not there.
Don’t be too keen to join the ‘it doesn’t happen in this day and age’ band wagon, as it does.
You should consider if not being homophobic is enough. Being anti-homophobic and acting as an ally and an advocate at all times is the only way to counteract the covert homophobia that is still there under the surface.

#Hopes4Ed Event Summary: There is a new conversation about education

This event will focused on our #Hopes4Ed theme #01: There is a new public conversation about education: Launch a commission on the future of education and learning in England that unites the needs and ambitions of learners, educators, employers, and parents.

 

To tackle the challenges of the future, we need to design education systems with a broader set of outcomes that support ‘whole child’ development and help young people develop the capability to thrive through change and become agents of change themselves.

 

The HeadsUp4HTs community are dedicated to this. Now is the time to discuss what the future of education should look like and what needs to change in order to make this happen.

 

Big Change have recently published a report in collaboration with IPPR detailing how Covid-19 has disrupted learning in an unprecedented way, and how we might rethink educational priorities to build back better. This means preparing children for life, not just exams & tackling inequalities outside, as well as inside, the classroom.

 

Have a read here: https://www.ippr.org/research/publications/the-new-normal and let us know your thoughts by completing this short survey bit.ly/bigchangesurvey

 

We will focused our HeadsUp4HTs discussions for this event around 3 key points:

  1. a conversation about how our education system can prepare children for life, not just exams
  2. a conversation about where and how learning takes place – as well as who is involved in it
  3. a conversation about the need to tackle inequalities outside, as well as inside, the classroom.

 

Here are some summarised points from the event. The voices of REAL, AUTHENTIC school leaders and big changers at the coal face of the education system.

 

What is Education for?

 

At our special school we have revised our whole curriculum to 'empower our pupils to take on the world'. Our whole school focus each half term is a 'big idea' - eg this half term DIVERSITY (in terms of race) and our teaching is underpinned by Oracy (Voice21)

 

The first thing I would say is what eduction is not. Stealing the late, great Sir Ken’s view, I don’t believe education should be based on the industrialisation of the employment market. I believe education is a mission to live out your talents in the pursuit of contributing to community.

 

Society has inevitably changed and this liminal space should be an opportunity and  time to evolve.

 

As a parent and campaigner I’d like to see schools liberated from backwards-looking education policy, especially around assessment and certain aspects of curriculum, so that all children can thrive and fulfil their potential. At the moment ideological clinging to assessment on the part of policy makers is the tail that wags the dog, and we see narrowed curriculums, children’s love of learning supressed,  valuable teaching time wasted, deprived communities left behind and teachers and heads throughly beaten down. There’s a huge opportunity for change now.

 

We often talk about the beat of the drum... OFSTED drum? Or a values-based, school mission drum? This comes down to what a) the accountability structure is and b) how success is measured and valued.

 

Across the Whole Education network we found that Student agency was the key barrier to remote learning - i.e. access to technology was a barrier but not the barrier - agency was

 

The system currently measures success by grades

 

But what do we measure the success of education by ...we'd all agree it's wider than the results. We need to reclaim this.

 

I agree with the focus on looking beyond exams - the role of tech in ed is much more complicated - not least because use of digital needs to be driven by pedagogy not vice versa, and the what digital pedagogy means for the primary age group is unresolved.  Plus giving everyone digital resources doesn't  solve the problems of sufficient physical space to use them in at home

 

Redefining success will be at the heart of the Co-mission’s agenda

 

There's so much in the neuroscience and EQ linked to disadvantage as well as belonging and agency. Social stereotyping is bound up with so many assumptions and expectations

 

The schools I've looked at in US that have flourished have recognise the value of community agency in education and how this responsibility is broader than just with schools.

 

What is education if our young people leave school without understanding and knowing how to find their place in the world?

 

For our pupils (SEND) the ability to communicate their needs and to be able to make informed decisions and reach informed opinions is key to their success and happiness in life

 

All too often I hear the term 'hard to reach communities' This is always from schools / academy chains that have often isolated the community and have kept them away because of the drive to get the best outcomes

 

Do we feel that the curriculum is narrowing post pandemic? Or, is there a renewed focus on a more holistic curriculum? Is our curriculum out dated and irrelevant in the ‘new normal’ post COVID?

 

We've expanded our curriculum - more protected time for outdoor learning, music & art - all great for positive mental health.

We have an archaic system & archaic curriculum in comparison to schools worldwide. Look at the outcomes of the curriculum in schools like The Green Schools in Bali and SA, a complete different outlook on what education should be with an incredible focus on ethical curriculum and sustainable living

 

The work I did with the RSC ( real Shakespeare people) all supported developing rich language and active engagement with language for all, not drilling for tests. AP children and children from diverse backgrounds felt valued and LOVED it...they flourished. It formed the basis from a rich and vibrant approach to curriculum.

 

Our research with parents and children on the subject of assessment in this school year: 

https://www.morethanascore.org.uk/parents-call-for-government-to-cancel-sats-in-2021-and-put-childrens-well-being-first/

 

Research with parents on the issues in general, showing that SATs  results are definitely not a priority when it comes to choosing a school: https://www.morethanascore.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/Parents-research.pdf

 

https://www.morethanascore.org.uk/primary-school-leaders-deliver-damning-verdict-on-high-pressure-testing/

 

The constraints of the system have for too long prevented schools from doing things differently. How can we show that there is another way when leaders fear what could happen?

 

I’m going to be a little bit provocative…..we have been here before with regards to wanting a different way…..the biggest difference is that we need to use the opportunity to action the change - I love discussion but I would also welcome action

 

So, what we need is actionable steps. To feed this back to DfE, to unions.

 

I've sat in on several conversations including with Head trade unions, where heads have been very strongly arguing against catch up and arguing also that their members shouldn't play the role of Ofsted inspectors, monitoring how fast catch up is going.  Our research project conducted a systematic review of the literature on "learning disruption" - not learning loss, a good deal of which is misleading.  The findings emphasise that recovery is helped by slowing down the curriculum, providing space for creative activities and opportunities for children to talk about their experience.  This is a useful reference point to counter the learning loss narrative that emphasises catching up

 

Agreed, slowing down the pace of curriculum and focus on getting the fundamentals right

 

The SEN curriculum has always been and will always be about the whole person. With SEN, we devise the outcomes that young people work towards and are assessed against. so powerful. We get to make a difference.

 

You might be interested in this paper on some ongoing research on the Phonics test in Year 2 bit.ly/AB_PSC

 

It takes us all to come together to make a difference. One HT in their school refusing to do the PSC just ends up with that HT in hot bother. We need to rise up together for change to be possible and now is the time.

 

We've been trying in the IOE project with Gemma to capture and document primary schools' experiences - to amplify the voices of the people who know what is happening in the real world. 

 

If you unpick what works, it’s because there’s a focus on the whole child, it is not exams driven and it’s about life skills and inner curriculum

 

I wonder if there are other ways of rebuilding stronger local partnerships between schools so that individual heads aren't left alone with the decisions they take.  Estelle Morris is chairing the Birmingham Education Partnership which is committed to working with all schools in or out of LA management - rather like London challenge

 

We have designed a system that allows a third of kids to feel like they’ve failed! What even IS that?

 

How about involving/looking at parents, children and communities as shareholders so that we are serving the needs of the people that the school lives in.

 

If SATs etc don’t go ahead this, that will be two years without them! Without the world ending. That is a very strong evidence base to say they should not come back.

 

Get parents on board by educating them too.  Together offer a curriculum that works for our community. 

 

We are doing something at a school level - we have transformed our curriculum and have consulted with staff and pupils. We are just getting on with it because we know its the right thing to do. So far the results (engagement and 'buzz') are exciting and are keeping us going through tough times

 

Our children are the business of everyone..Whether we like it or not the world is transforming...we HAVE to transform their education...it won't fit their world. This is part of the message. The world has changed, and we can all clearly see what attitudes, skills and values that have been so valuable in working through this and thinking creatively about it.


#TheNewNormalEdBook: A HeadsUp4HTs Event Summary

It was a pleasure to host the first in a series of HeadsUp4HTs events focused around The future of Education: What should Education Be?

 

James and Kate welcomed the HeadsUp community, alongside Diana Osagie, Arv Kaushal and Dr Emma Kell and held an electric discussion focused around 3 inspirational chapter from Opogo’s EdBook, which focuses on identifying and implementation a new and purposeful way of educating.

 

Diana empowered us to become Captains in an army of Change. A reminder that we are not defined by our roles as Headteachers, as school leaders. We are more than that. We have the voice, the strength and the power to influence the education system for the better. We will not reduce what we do to a mere title.

 

‘We hold the door open to the future of the nation’

 

‘We can’t keep doing the same normal.’

 

Diana challenged us to think about what changes we would like to see in the system. Thi is what we said:

 

I would love to see…..schools embracing inclusion in its TRUEST form - embracing difference

 

I would like to see an Ethical Curriculum that is devoted to development of self, of others and a sustainable way of living

 

I would love to see….less reliance and strength on the examination process

 

I want well-being for all of the community the top priority.

 

Fairer assessment of progress and achievement

 

A culturally and historically honest and true curriculum.

 

An emphasis on sustainable relationships

 

An end to the social mobility narrative in education - how can we empower young people to be the best people they can be, not just make the most money?

 

I would like schools to be judged against whether they deliver their school motto - every school has a statement of values, but we get judged on data...

 

I would love to see the role of HT become one that is manageable and realistic. 

 

I want all teachers entering the profession to lead a values based strategy to learning development.

 

I need to see that people, families and pupils are not marginalised. I want to see acceptance and a curriculum for all. I want to see consensus and collaboration. 

 

I would love to see more cognitively diverse recruitment panels - with clearer comments when giving feedback to those that weren't appointed - as opposed to inappropriate an lacking in authenticity feedback

 

I want to see competition broken down between schools and really see everyone working together to change education of every child for the better - stop referring to 'brave' leadership - it's just doing what is right for our children.  We shouldn't have to be being brave!  We are just doing what we know is the absolute right thing! 

 

So how are we going to action the above? We will be discussing these points more in our forthcoming meetings and events. But, in the meantime, hold yourselves to account the changes you want to make. What small steps can you achieve in the mean time? How will you start your journey into a new education?

 

Arv shared a moving experience of belonging. Belonging in the UK, belonging in the school’s education system. His vulnerability and transparency was applauded by the community He asked us, ‘How can we ensure that diversity and inclusion remains high on every agenda?’

 

Some points from the conversation that followed:

 

We need to be aware. Hold mirrors up to ourselves and to each other in a compassionate way. Moving from the unconscious to the conscious

 

How do we move from the current state of education to a path that is more aligned to our values and visions?

 

A question for everyone - Do you think the feeling of belonging is different when a protected characteristic is not visible? 

 

Honesty and integrity...comes down to having a long look at self... then re examining . The policy formation needs to be grounded in why...not just how and what.

 

The How is the greatest challenge I think

 

How do we get persons not aligned to our way of thinking etc to see a different point of view? The why is clear. But as Arv has said, the diversity of thought etc in the leadership isn't there.

 

We gotta get started - if not now, then when? Tangible strategies would support next steps.

 

I believe that a unified and conscious sense of belonging is a start. Getting to that start point is uncomfortable but essential. Needs to be meaningful and authentic

 

It’s a tough system, so we need to do all we can can to make sure every pupil and every member of staff belongs

 

We can't carry on like this- change is needed. 

 

We exist! We have voices. We want to make changes. We are powerful!

 

The theme that links both speakers is: "If not now, when and if not us, who?"

 

Dr Emma Kell gave us 5 questions around Wellbeing to think about, following from HeadsUp discussions around sustainable headship, wellbeing and the support (or lack of) available for Headteachers. 

 

1 - How will you know when your wellbeing is under threat?

2 - Where do you go where you don’t think about work?

3 - What’s your next concrete step in looking after yourself?

4 - Who can help you?

5 - When will you take time for YOU?

 

Some of our thoughts and comments focused on wellbeing ensued…

 

The problem we have is that the system is predicated on working way too many hours to achieve "an acceptable standard of education." I resigned at Christmas as a head and my wellbeing is 100% better. I've time for me and my family. It shouldn't have to take me leaving the profession to achieve acceptable personal wellbeing.

 

My work life balance is fantastic since I left headship

 

(In response) That's a sad reality for many at the moment Andy.  It has to change

 

I’ve spent 4yrs dedicated to writing the wellbeing section of the new curriculum

 

How do we change it? The DfE talk about wellbeing but neither they nor Ofsted understand the concept.

 

Being part of a Mat unfortunately put more layers on the time constraints and I was less in control of my time, but I still feel guilty spending time on me!

 

Thank you for highlighting that I have neglected my own wellbeing

 

Need to remind all of the teachers in my life, especially heads, of their FABULOSITY

 

I’m thinking about what disseminates from our Trust board and its impact on the leadership in our school.... I want to get brave and assertive on creating that not having it done to my fabulous school

 

Well being for HTs is absolutely key! It's been difficult for me as a HT this term but I am trying-will walk the school tomorrow pm after my HT time in the morning, at home, reflecting...

 

Model the values you believe in

 

We have to make sure our oxygen mask is on first!

 

If you are working so many hours what are you doing wrong?

 

Because so much of what we are asked to do, from above, is irrelevant!! but we are held to account on it.

 

It is also whether you feel you are supported - by your governors, trustees etc.

 

OFSTED are driving force in grinding school leaders down :(

 

Then the question continues… accountability for what purpose? To whom? If it doesn't add value to your pupils and community, then why? Who decides?

 

When did OFSTED and DfE know more than Headteachers at the coal face??

 

At the moment the frequency of changes in guidance and responses needed for updating risk assessments and covid response...this almost creates a new role within the school dedicated to covid response. The accountability hoops in that we have the additional pressures drives behaviours

 

At the moment Covid takes over the day and all the rest happens in the evening!

 

The agenda and responsibility of the GB to monitor headteacher wellbeing often feels artificial and tick box - and therefore not valuable!